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Link List for May 24, 2013

Echoes of Eden: Reflections on Christianity, Literature, and the Arts (eBook) | Ebooks | Crossway

The digital version of Jerram Barrs' new book, released this month, is on sale for just $2.00. Through Crossway only.

#055: How to Read a Non-Fiction Book [Podcast] | Michael Hyatt

Michael Hyatt offers ten great tips for reading non–fiction books quickly. For example, don't feel like you need to finish every book you start. Some books, Hyatt argues, simply aren't worth finishing. Good advice from someone who spent years working in the publishing industry.

Leadership from the Heart - Posts - "Twenty Points On Leading Twentysomethings."

Twenty takeaways from Brad Lomenick’s new book, The Catalyst Leader, for those who lead and work with twentysomethings. I haven't yet read The Catalyst Leader, but it's on my list.

5 Reasons I Switched to Scrivener for All My Writing | Michael Hyatt

More from Michael Hyatt. In this blog post he explains how he uses Scrivener, a powerful writing tool for the Mac.

Church Planting and Preparing for Reproduction

Scott Thomas outlines five reasons for planting churches in a recent post at ChurchPlanting.com. Among them, he discusses the importance of reproduction for the local church:

Aubrey Malphurs believes that the secret to a vibrant Christianity is a pregnant church, culminating in reproduction. He emphasized the importance of a sending church preparing itself for reproduction (Nuts and Bolts of Church Planting, Malphurs, 2011). As a church is developing leaders, clarifying vision, sending people and resources, articulating doctrines and strategizing for mission, it will have a spiritual vibrancy accompanying these pre-birth activities.

Thomas summarizes this way:

A church on mission prioritizes its sending capacity over its seating capacity. This reproductive generosity brings health to the mother church as well as to the baby churches.

Something that Todd Bumgarner said from the very beginning is that 2 Pillars is going to be a church that plants churches. Just like a engaged couple discussing future family plans and their desire for children, reproduction was part of the vision of 2 Pillars before it was even planted.

The prayer now is that God would bless our plans and preparation and continue to grow 2 Pillars in size and maturity in order that we might give birth to another church to be planted in the city of Lincoln.

Why plant more churches in Lincoln? Check out the entire post here.

Assigning Keyboard Shortcuts to Bookmarklets in Chrome

A while ago I posted about using Safari’s native keyboard shortcut for quick access to the bookmarks in your Bookmarks Bar. Unfortunately, Chrome doesn’t assign keyboard shortcuts to bookmarks natively. That doesn’t mean, however, that it can’t be done. First, go to System Preferences > Keyboard and click on the Keyboard Shortcuts tab. Click on Application Shortcuts—it should be an option on the left–hand side of the window.

Screen Shot 2013-02-23 at 3.00.35 PM
Screen Shot 2013–02–23 at 3.00.35 PM

Now click on the + to add a shortcut. Another dialogue box will pop up with three fields: Application, Menu Title, and Keyboard Shortcut. Here’s what you need to do in each of those three fields:

Application: Choose the appropriate application. In this case Google Chrome.

Menu Title: Type the name of the bookmark or bookmarklet, exactly as it appears in Chrome. For example, in the photo below, I would type “bitly Sidebar” if I wanted to assign a keyboard shortcut to that bookmark. For Pinboard I would type—yep, you guessed it—“Pinboard.”

Chrome Bookmarks Bar
Chrome Bookmarks Bar

Keyboard Shortcut: Assign your keyboard shortcut[1]. For easy reference, I assign ^1, ^2, ^3, etc. to the bookmarks in my Bookmarks Bar, moving from left to right.

Of course, you aren’t restricted to assigning keyboard shortcuts to the bookmarks in the Bookmarks Bar only. You can assign keyboard shortcuts to any bookmark you have saved. My most used bookmarks and bookmarklets tend to be located there, however, so they are the ones that are assigned shortcuts.

Now, if I want to send a blog post to Instapaper for later reading, I simply press ^1. Need to create a shortened bitly link for the page I’m currently on? ^5.

Slick.

This is easy to remember and can save you a lot of time over the long haul.

If you are a Chrome user on an Apple machine, then this is well worth your time to set up. Give it a try.

What are your favorite time–saving browser keyboard shortcuts or tips?



  1. You’ll want to make sure you don’t choose a shortcut that is already in use. Since Chrome uses ⌘1, ⌘2, ⌘3 as keyboard shortcuts to jump to open tabs, I use the Control key instead.  ↩



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