culture

Poverty, Abortion, and the Culture War

Matthew Loftus, writing for Mere Orthodoxy, in response to Freedom Road's recent statement calling for Evangelical women to "hit pause" on the culture war: 

I am wholly in favor of ensuring that everyone in the world has access to quality healthcare; I have spent my short career working towards this goal and writing about why this is a moral imperative for the state. I subscribe to many similar ideas about the crucial importance of poverty reduction. Yet I cannot accept the canard that other legal interventions against abortion can somehow be rendered unnecessary by reducing poverty, and it is a failure of both imagination and courage to suggest otherwise. Poverty and abortion are both the natural outworkings of evil systems that exploit and abuse human beings made in the image of God; simply replacing Anthony Kennedy with another justice like him will only keep the status quo of culture war where it is now and fail to transform the Christian political imagination as it needs to be transformed. Let us fast, pray, and listen, yes—but let us not accept a lesser solution.

I appreciate Loftus's unwavering desire to protect the lives of the unborn, while making both left and right-leaning Christians uncomfortable in the process. The above quote serves as a summary, but the entire post is worth a read.

 

Obstructions

John Stott on the closing verses of 2 Timothy:

Paul is fully alert to the difficulties, however, both internal and external. Timothy himself is inexperienced, infirm and shy. The world’s opposition is strong and subtle. And behind these things stands the devil, bent on ‘taking men alive’ and keeping them prisoner. For the devil hates the gospel and uses all his strength and cunning to obstruct its progress, now by perverting it in the mouths of those who preach it, now by frightening them into silence through persecution or ridicule, now by persuading them to advance beyond it into some fancy novelty, now by making them so busy with defending the gospel that they have no time to proclaim it.

The Missional Legacy of Saint Patrick

Bob Thune:

It’s no accident that St. Patrick’s Day is identified with all things Irish. Within 200 years of Patrick’s arrival, Ireland was a Christian nation. One man gave his life to see a nation reached with the gospel – and today that nation still celebrates his influence.

Thune's post honoring "one of the greatest Christian missionaries in history" is a must-read this St. Patrick's Day.

New York Times on the 'Calvinist Revival'

Denny Burk on a Friday New York Times article about the recent resurgence of Calvinism among evangelicals and comparisons between the reformed resurgence and the emergent church:

The emergent church represented theological innovation. The reformed resurgence is a rallying around something old. The emergent church comprised a theologically liberal impulse. The reformed resurgence comprises a conservative one—one rooted in the rallying cry of the reformation Sola Scriptura.

Read the NYT article here.

Social Media as a Listening Platform

Gary Vaynerchurchuk :

I sat there drinking my crisp, flinty Riesling, laughed to myself, and thought once again, “people still don’t get social media.” Social media is the first true listening platform, not speaking platform. Yes, you can speak on it. Many will, and many do so successfully, but on the flip side, riding the wave of hashtags instead of creating them is a defining part of my thesis on social media.

I’ve been thinking a lot lately about how we might better engage as a church on social media platforms and in the digital space. I suspect we could do a much better job of listening. Perhaps this would lead to us holding more conversations with the people in our city and doing less speaking at them?



© 2019 Adam Stahr ¯\_(ツ)_/¯