eldership

Desire and Calling

Jeremy Writebol offers a wise word of caution regarding desire and calling to ministry:

Desire can be a tricky thing, mainly because the real objects of our desire can be hidden behind something else. For example, I may desire the respect and adoration and accolades that come with preaching heart-hitting, Biblically sound messages. But that doesn't mean I desire to be engaged in the work of the ministry. It just means I want people to respect and affirm me. We have to drill down deep within our motives to find what sits and the root of why we long for what we do.

Though desire should accompany one's calling to eldership, to have desire doesn't necessarily mean that one has been called.

Psalm 139:23–24 was a helpful passage to memorize, pray through, and meditate upon as I wrestled with my own desire and calling:

Search me, O God, and know my heart!

Try me and know my thoughts!

And see if there be any grievous way in me,

and lead me in the way everlasting!

Link List for July 25th, 2013

How Many Hours Must a Pastor Work to Satisfy the Congregation? | Thom RainerWow.

How to Hear a Word from God | Trevin Wax Redeem your commute! Adam Gabriel Cavalier in a guest post: "I believe we should value the reading of God’s Word, but we should also value the listening of Scripture being read aloud. I think this is a highly neglected and yet an equally valid means of valuing God’s Word in your life."

Is Your Child a Christian? | The Gospel Coalition Blog Brian Croft: "Admitting the obvious—that we are not God and cannot see the heart—I maintain certain evidence can help us discern the legitimacy of child or teenager's profession of faith."

God-Centered, Bible-Saturated Leadership

John Knight recounts being drawn in by false teaching and almost becoming a false teacher himself. It was the God-centered, Bible-saturated, Spirit-filled leadership of his pastors, Knight explains, that helped him to correct his course:

Younger pastors should realize that God will bring issues into your churches of which you have no experience and of which there are few resources from a God-centered perspective. Disability is one of those issues. What families like mine need from you, more than anything, is that you remember Jesus alone is the source of your hope. The greatest help you can provide is to keep us in the Bible and show us your own affections for God and his word, even when the passages are hard to understand. Show us your passion to submit to God’s revelation gladly.

When you are saturated in the Bible, that subtle, non-biblical voice someone like me may inadvertently bring into your church will be felt. When felt, you can move up next to it, seek to understand it, and respond to it in loving ways, with wisdom that God will provide. Your God-centered leadership can guide such a false-teacher-in-training away from that which would kill him and others. Maybe you’ll have to endure some harsh and unkind words in response. Or maybe God will use your firm, gentle, courageous engagement to turn a false teacher into a passionate lover of God and his word.

 



© 2019 Adam Stahr ¯\_(ツ)_/¯