politics

Poverty, Abortion, and the Culture War

Matthew Loftus, writing for Mere Orthodoxy, in response to Freedom Road's recent statement calling for Evangelical women to "hit pause" on the culture war: 

I am wholly in favor of ensuring that everyone in the world has access to quality healthcare; I have spent my short career working towards this goal and writing about why this is a moral imperative for the state. I subscribe to many similar ideas about the crucial importance of poverty reduction. Yet I cannot accept the canard that other legal interventions against abortion can somehow be rendered unnecessary by reducing poverty, and it is a failure of both imagination and courage to suggest otherwise. Poverty and abortion are both the natural outworkings of evil systems that exploit and abuse human beings made in the image of God; simply replacing Anthony Kennedy with another justice like him will only keep the status quo of culture war where it is now and fail to transform the Christian political imagination as it needs to be transformed. Let us fast, pray, and listen, yes—but let us not accept a lesser solution.

I appreciate Loftus's unwavering desire to protect the lives of the unborn, while making both left and right-leaning Christians uncomfortable in the process. The above quote serves as a summary, but the entire post is worth a read.

 

Lincoln Students React to the Election

Margaret Reist, reporting for the Lincoln Journal Star, did an excellent job of capturing the post-election reaction of students in Lincoln, a Refugee Friendly city. I think it's safe to say these Lincoln Public Schools teachers and administrators earned their salaries this week.

Lincoln High School principal, Mark Larson:

"When students began to enter the building there was a palpable tension, a palpable anxiety in the air,” he said. “You could feel it. Students were raw yesterday, emotionally. More than any other day that I can remember in my career.”

And it wasn't just the older high school students who were affected:

At Belmont Elementary, a first-grade student in Laurie Martinez's English Language Learner class raised her hand.

“How soon am I going to have to go back?” she asked. 

Martinez said she was not prepared for first-graders to be worried about the election.

"I was naive," she said.

The Consequences of the Fall in the Political Realm

Bruce Ashford and Chris Pappalardo in their book, One Nation Under God: A Christian Hope for American Politics:

So, the political realm has everything to do with our relationships to other people. In the aftermath of the fall, the political realm remains structurally good but has been corrupted directionally. In other words, God structured the world in such a way that we would have politics and public life, and the fact of its existence is good. But because of the depravity of the human heart, politics and public life are always to some extent directed toward idols rather than toward God.

They continue:

The problem runs deep, deeper than most political analysts even conceive. But the problem is never politics, per se. Liberals aren't the problem. Conservatives aren't the problem. Politicians aren't the problem. We are. We all are—because we all have the entrenched tendency to twist God's created order into idolatry. Pointed toward Christ, anything in creation becomes a blessing. Pointed away from him, the greatest blessing becomes a curse.

The Churchgoing Evangelical Vote Split

Justin Taylor via Twitter:



© 2019 Adam Stahr ¯\_(ツ)_/¯